Japanese anime – Mazingerz World http://mazingerz-world.com/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 22:36:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mazingerz-world.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/anime.png Japanese anime – Mazingerz World http://mazingerz-world.com/ 32 32 Jerusalem-inspired Japanese anime hits the big screen in Israel https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/ https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 13:35:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/ Cars drive on a highway as a train enters a station in Tel Aviv, Israel on November 25, 2018. Photo taken on November 25, 2018. REUTERS / Corinna Kern JNS.org – Not just Naruto and Dragon Ball: “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors […]]]>

Cars drive on a highway as a train enters a station in Tel Aviv, Israel on November 25, 2018. Photo taken on November 25, 2018. REUTERS / Corinna Kern

JNS.org – Not just Naruto and Dragon Ball: “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE The Divine Realm of the Roundtable: Wandering Camelot; Agateram.

The film is based on the free-to-play “Fate / Grand Order” (FGO) mobile game.

Although not available in app stores in Israel, FGO launched in 2015 and has over 42 million downloads. It also spawned an empire of spinoffs and branded products, including TV series, Manga comics, and even theatrical productions in Tokyo and Osaka.

The brand has essentially been so successful in Japan that it’s even compared to Pokemon Go.

Now, amid the growing popularity of the anime genre in Israel, thanks in large part to TikTok, Israeli theaters are bringing the film to the big screen. The connection to Israel goes beyond mere commerce, however, as it is relevant to the plot of the story, which takes place in Jerusalem in 1273, when an evil king threatens to destroy the holy city and transform it. in the desert.


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Jerusalem-inspired Japanese anime hits the big screen in Israel https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel-2/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 09:07:12 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel-2/ (November 1, 2021 / Israel Hayom) Not Just Naruto and Dragon Ball: The “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film. hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE Divine Kingdom of the […]]]>

Not Just Naruto and Dragon Ball: The “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film. hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE Divine Kingdom of the Round Table: Camelot Errant; Agateram.

The film is based on the free-to-play “Fate / Grand Order” (FGO) mobile game.

Although not available in app stores in Israel, FGO launched in 2015 and has over 42 million downloads. It also spawned an empire of spinoffs and branded products, including TV series, Manga comics, and even theatrical productions in Tokyo and Osaka.

The brand has essentially been so successful in Japan that it’s even compared to Pokemon Go.

Now, amid the growing popularity of the anime genre in Israel, thanks in large part to TikTok, Israeli theaters are bringing the film to the big screen.

The connection to Israel goes beyond mere commerce, however, as it is relevant to the plot of the story, which takes place in Jerusalem in 1273 when an evil king threatens to destroy the holy city and turn it into a desert.

This report first appeared in Israel Hayom.


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Samurai and lightsabers! Star Wars meets Japanese anime in ‘Star Wars: Visions’ https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/ https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/ All Star wars a fan worth his Craitian salt would know that one of George Lucas’ greatest inspirations for the film was the iconic 1958 film by legendary Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa The hidden fortress. This isn’t the only time the Star Wars franchise has drawn inspiration from Japan. Samurai-influenced elements of Darth Vader’s Helmet […]]]>

All Star wars a fan worth his Craitian salt would know that one of George Lucas’ greatest inspirations for the film was the iconic 1958 film by legendary Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa The hidden fortress.

This isn’t the only time the Star Wars franchise has drawn inspiration from Japan. Samurai-influenced elements of Darth Vader’s Helmet and Jedi Honor Code, Obi-Wan Kenobi’s final one-shot duel with Darth Maul in Star Wars Rebels, the entire Star Wars franchise is peppered with influences from Japanese culture and films.

But what if it was the other way around? What kind of stories Star wars inspire Japanese filmmakers, especially anime producers, to do?

This is the main concept behind Star Wars: Visions, an anthology of nine anime episodes produced by seven different Japanese animation studios, each bringing their own narrative and visual style to the board. These include Production IG, best known for the iconic Ghost in the shell, and Kamikaze Douga, known for his work on JoJo’s bizarre adventure lively.

Star Wars: Visions is an anthology of nine animated episodes produced by seven different Japanese animation studios. From Star Wars Visions short ‘The Elder. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

According to Star Wars: Visions executive producer James Waugh, anime is something that has always influenced everyone behind the Star Wars franchise.

“We are all huge fans of anime. This is something that has really influenced a lot of us… you can see it in a lot of the work that has been done at Lucasfilm, ”he said in a recent video panel interview with regional media.

“The whole point of creating the Visions framework was to allow this kind of fun and festive storytelling to exist alongside any of our proven animations, ”he added.

Lucasfilm has selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a filmmaking medium.  - Photo: Disney + HotstarLucasfilm has selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a filmmaking medium. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

According to producer Kanako Shirasaki, who previously worked on Netflix Eden animated series, Visions It’s not just about Japanese filmmakers creating Japanese Star Wars stories, as each studio also has filmmakers from different cultures.

For example, she explains, The dual by Kamikaze Douga has a very “Kurosawa movie aesthetic” and is a “Samurai Meets Star Wars short”. Other episodes, like that of Eunyoung Choi Akakiri, is the Korean director’s take on Japanese cinema, animation and Star Wars.

“Abel Góngora (who directed the droid-centric T0-B1) is a Spanish director who creates Japanese anime in Japan!” She said. “You can see a lot of different cultural aspects (in Visions) … so these are their interpretations of Japanese culture, ”she said.

“T0-B1” is directed by Spanish director Abel Góngora. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

While the episodes are available in their original Japanese dialogue (and English subtitles), it’s worth watching them in English as well, as the series features a stellar vocal cast that includes the likes of Temuera Morrison (who play Jango fett in the Star Wars prequel films and Boba Fett in The Mandalorian and the next one Boba Fett’s book), George Takei, Simu Liu, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Neil Patrick Harris, Lucy Liu, Karen Fukuhara and even the Malaysian Henry Golding.

Lucasfilm is notoriously strict when it comes to every aspect of the Star Wars franchise, from the continuity of the stories to the number of buttons on Darth Vader’s chest, but for Visions, they gave free rein to the anime studios to do whatever they wanted.

“We approached Visions of a very festive place. It was a setting for creators to explore whatever element of the galaxy they love and tell their stories in their medium, ”says Waugh.

This is the cutest Jabba The Hutt we've seen so far.  Extract from the episode This is the cutest Jabba The Hutt we’ve seen so far. Excerpt from the episode “Tatooine Rhapsody” from Star Wars: Vision. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

He adds that the studios’ initial brief was that they weren’t looking for “deep stories” that tell the origin of a specific character or a defining story about a known character, but more original stories.

“We wanted to know what they could do if all bets were off, and they could just use whatever Star Wars elements they wanted!” he said.

Ultimately, Waugh said, they selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a medium for filmmaking.

“We selected these studios in a place of love because we are really fans of a lot of their work. They all did something a little differently. (Some) told quieter stories or more heartfelt stories or more romantic stories, and others are just bombastic action … we wanted it all! ” he said.

Star Wars: Visions is currently airing on Disney + Hotstar.


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Jordan Fisher on the challenges of dubbing Japanese anime into English https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/ https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/ He also talks about how he keeps his voice fresh when working on Broadway. With the anime anthology series Star Wars: Visions now streaming on Disney +, I recently spoke with Jordan fisher about voicing one of the characters in the episode titled Wool. During the interview, Fisher spoke about what she was told about […]]]>

He also talks about how he keeps his voice fresh when working on Broadway.


Interview of Jordan-Fisher-Star Wars visions on social networks

With the anime anthology series Star Wars: Visions now streaming on Disney +, I recently spoke with Jordan fisher about voicing one of the characters in the episode titled Wool. During the interview, Fisher spoke about what she was told about her episode and her character before signing, what people would be surprised to learn about the voice recording process, how though you match the Japanese dubbing, you have the freedom with your delivery, and Continued. Plus, he explained how he keeps his voice fresh and works when performing on Broadway.

If you haven’t seen the trailer, Star Wars: Visions brings together seven Japanese anime studios for nine standalone stories that take place at different points in the Star wars universe. Each studio uses its own style of animation and storytelling to offer episodes ranging from 13 to 22 minutes and featuring all types of characters and locations. If you are an anime fan and Star wars, you must push the reading on these episodes immediately.

star-wars-visions-trailer-image-5

Image via Disney +

RELATED: ‘Star Wars: Visions’ Review: The Far, Far Galaxy Has Never Been More Exciting

Take a look at what he had to say in the player above and below, this is exactly what we talked about and the

Jordan fisher

  • What’s cooler: Win Dancing with the stars or be a voice in Star wars?

  • How he is a huge fan of anime.

  • I jokingly ask how much he paid to be on the show.

  • What could he see from his episode before he dropped his voice?

  • How, even if you match the Japanese dub, you have the freedom of delivery.

  • What would people be surprised to learn about the voice recording process?

  • What’s the secret to keeping your voice fresh when performing on Broadway?

star-wars-visions-trailer-social-2


Interview with Masi-Oka's Star Wars Visions
Masi Oka on ‘Star Wars: Visions’ and the difference between Japanese and American dubbing

He also teases what it was like to be a part of David Leitch’s assassin movie “Bullet Train”.

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Japanese anime’s “Belle” seeks to rewrite female power script | Way of life https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-animes-belle-seeks-to-rewrite-female-power-script-way-of-life/ https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-animes-belle-seeks-to-rewrite-female-power-script-way-of-life/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-animes-belle-seeks-to-rewrite-female-power-script-way-of-life/ TOKYO – In her life in the Japanese countryside, Suzu is a shy, freckled 17-year-old girl who is embarrassed by her appearance and has lost the desire to play music after her mother’s death. But in the virtual world, known as “U,” she transforms into Belle, an enchanting global pop superstar with flowing pink hair […]]]>

TOKYO – In her life in the Japanese countryside, Suzu is a shy, freckled 17-year-old girl who is embarrassed by her appearance and has lost the desire to play music after her mother’s death.

But in the virtual world, known as “U,” she transforms into Belle, an enchanting global pop superstar with flowing pink hair and a bewitching facial design that resembles freckles.

The animated film “Belle” – a hit in Japan that will make its US debut at the New York Film Festival on September 25 – also carries a bit of artistic rebellion.

The film’s message on empowering women gained attention for overturning the script on anime, the iconic style of Japanese animated films and graphic novels that often portrayed girls and women as weak, empty. meaningless and hypersexualized.

The message resonated in Japan at a time when a growing number of women are calling for change – most recently laid bare by a series of sexist comments from senior Olympic officials that sparked backlash.

“I think female characters in Japanese cartoons are often portrayed through the lens of desire leading to their sexual exploitation, and too much is seen as freedom of expression,” said film director Mamoru Hosoda. , in an interview earlier this month. at Studio Chizu, his animation studio in the suburbs of Tokyo.

From Disney princesses to Marvel superheroes, from anime to pop music, creators of all genres are rethinking how to portray women and girls with agency and dignity, and show that being imperfect is just as beautiful. Global movements such as #MeToo have also underscored a sense of common purpose.

Hosoda said he hopes to draw attention to how Japanese animation has shaped audiences’ perceptions of women and girls, and what it means to be beautiful and powerful.

“Such exploitation [has been] . . . justified by the idea that it takes place in a fantasy world, and not in reality. But I feel that, surely, such perceptions are linked and will influence our reality, “he added, sipping coffee in his office, decorated with posters and figurines.

Japanese animation, which includes anime and manga, is one of the country’s biggest cultural exports and has gained popularity through digital streaming services.

But the problematic portrayal of women in cartoons, especially in television shows aimed at men, has been a concern for advocates of gender equality. Such depictions are both overt – exaggerated breasts and scantily clad girls – and subtle, such as stories in which girls are damsels in distress and secondary to boys.

In recent years, directors such as Hosoda have sought to challenge the views of Japanese society that may devalue women, said Akiko Sugawa, a professor at Yokohama National University of Japan specializing in gender and gender studies. anime.

“Anime has the power to create and shatter gender stereotypes,” she said.

Sugawa said there is still a lot of room for improvement, including the need for more women and LGBTQ anime directors.

“There are now more positive portrayals of LGBTQ characters, issues, and work that pose questions about societal issues. And with the rise of more diverse anime directors and makers, there are l ‘hope for more change to come,’ said Sugawa.

“Belle” is a modern take on the Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast”. After her mother dies while trying to save a child from danger, Suzu struggles to fit into school. She joins the virtual “U” world as Belle, a talented artist in eye-catching outfits who instantly gains billions of followers.

With the computer skills of her best friend and the emotional support of her late mother’s friends, Suzu / Belle sets out on an adventure to help a mysterious beast. Along the way, Belle performs several songs that can now be heard in all shopping districts of Tokyo. Since its July release, “Belle” has become the third highest grossing Japanese film this year.

In the film, Hosoda seeks to give women and girls more depth and humanity than is normally portrayed in anime. Through Suzu / Belle, he juxtaposes how Suzu’s inner beauty and Belle’s dynamism coexist in one person. For Suzu, an introverted teenager, her online persona is not just an imagination or an escape, but rather a part of herself that she ends up becoming.

Hosoda said he wanted to give Belle more complexity, in the same way the character of Beast in the original Disney film received that depth.

“Much like the beast having a duality, I wanted Belle to have two sides as well and focus on how both sides play, ultimately leading to her personal growth,” he said.

Hosoda received a 14-minute standing ovation at his film’s premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in July. Belle was reproduced by cosplayers, who dress up as anime characters. The animated character Belle “performed” the title song of the film at the Fuji Rock Festival last month.

On social media, Japanese fans raved about the film’s positive message, stunning visuals and catchy tunes. “Those who are having difficulty in their lives, those who want to change but can’t, I hope they see this movie. It really helps you take a step forward,” one person tweeted.

Hosoda, 53, has long focused on the cyber world in his works, including film versions of “Digimon” in 1999 and 2000 and his early feature films such as “Summer Wars”.

His films, especially in recent years, have portrayed women and girls as independent and determined characters, including the ‘Mirai’ of 2018, a story about a boy who goes wild after the birth of his younger sister but learns about it. importance of family ties. The film earned Hosoda an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Feature.

But through “Belle,” Hosoda delivered perhaps her most explicit message about empowering women and the power of technology as a force for good. He said he was inspired by his 5-year-old daughter as he envisions the future she will face as she grows up.

“She’s still in kindergarten and is pretty introverted, so I imagined how she was going to survive once she got on social media and started having all kinds of interactions online,” he said. he declared.

Hosoda said he wanted to challenge narratives warning of growing reliance on the internet.

“For the younger generation, the norm will be to live in both worlds and for both worlds to be their realities,” he said. “And the internet plays a huge role in making their voices heard and spreading around the world.”

“Belle” should be released in American theaters this winter.


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Manga Mon Amour: On the French passion for Japanese anime https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/ https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/ PARIS – When I was in sixth grade, Cartoon Network aired episodes of the TV show Code Lyoko almost everyday around 3pm I was a loyal fan – I watched pretty much every day when I got home from school. In the show, a group of teenagers engage in a virtual battle against a virus-like […]]]>

PARIS – When I was in sixth grade, Cartoon Network aired episodes of the TV show Code Lyoko almost everyday around 3pm I was a loyal fan – I watched pretty much every day when I got home from school.

In the show, a group of teenagers engage in a virtual battle against a virus-like artificial intelligence force that threatens to wreak havoc in the physical world. If I had to categorize it, I would loosely place it in the “anime-influenced western animation series” box. Little informed as I was, I had simply assumed that the series was a true Japanese anime, when in reality it was a French animated television series. Fast forward a decade: I had just moved to the Paris area and started working as an English teacher in college. Around halfway through the day, it was time for free reading. As I was telling my students to get their reading material out, I was struck by the fact that, one by one, virtually all of them released the same thing: Manga.

This mainstream status in France surprised me after my experience in an American college, where being a fan of manga (or anime) was generally frowned upon. If you were looking to gain popularity, your favorite book might be the Sorority of travel pants, or the Ugly series. The manga was more of a niche interest and, as such, was often seen as “bizarre,” perhaps indicating some latent xenophobia. And yet here are my French students – those who yearn for freshness and wallflowers – avidly leafing through their copies of Demon slayer Where A play.

Of course, in recent years, anime and manga have become more popular in the United States. Celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Michael B Jordan are open fans, much to the chagrin of those who hate the idea of ​​the genre being overtaken by “normies”. But in France, the story is quite different. Anime and manga are extremely popular and have long held a special place in them, as a recent article by The world.

“You just have to look up and you will see it everywhere in the school,” Solal, a 16-year-old high school student in Brittany, told the French daily. “Tons of people wear cartoon-inspired t-shirts or sweaters. Some people even have phone cases with characters from their favorite series, while others can be a bit more low-key and just have cartoons on their computer screen. “

The manga has actually gone beyond the traditional comic book style, becoming the most popular comic book sold in France.

France is in fact ranked second among consumers of manga outside of Japan. And it’s a love story that goes back decades, to 1978 to be precise, when it first appeared on public television as an after-school series.

Young viewers tapped into the public television channel of a production group called Club Dorothée to watch series such as Grendizer Where Maya the Bee. These low budget shows would pave the way for well-known shows like Dragon balland Sailor moon. Interestingly, the anime as a genre originally encountered a backlash, as opponents decried the genre’s tendency to over-sexualize the characters and portray too much gore and violence. And yet in some ways the bad press served to make the anime more popular, and as the anime took off, so did the manga.

France was already fertile ground for the manga market given its rich history of graphic novels, or as they are called in French: comics (BD for short). Cultural phenomena like The Adventures of Tintin (1929) and Asterix (1959) left their mark on generations of French people, some in France even qualifying comics as “9th Art”. Each year, France hosts the Angoulême International Comics Festival, the second comic strip festival in Europe and the third in the world, after the Comiket festival in Japan. Several French government officials attend the event each year, and in 2019 Franck Riester, a former Minister of Culture, even gave a speech where he compared the importance of the Comic Strip Festival to that of the Festival de Cannes at the cinema.

France was already fertile ground for the manga market given its rich history of graphic novels – Photo: Visual / ZUMA Wire

So converting to manga wasn’t such a big demand for a culture that was already in love with comics. But in 2005, the manga surpassed the traditional comic book style, becoming the most popular comic sold in France. And as manga and anime took hold of France, the French began to create their own comics and series – French-style. Publishers who have sought to create manga “à la française”, or Manfras, tend to feature artwork inspired by Japanese manga while sometimes featuring left-to-right reading styles or incorporating a bandaged design-hard cover style. Their popularity is also growing, both in France and in Japan, as evidenced by the success of Radiant, a French comic strip written and illustrated by Tony Valente, and published by Ankama, the French entertainment company.

Satoko Inaba, editorial director of the publishing house, said Glénat The world that publishing houses have been inundated with requests for publication in this style. “We have loads of projects coming up,” he said.

It’s here that Code Lyoko, the show that caught my eye so much as an 11-year-old fits in perfectly. Created by French animators Thomas Romain and Tania Palumbo, the show’s illustrative style is a tribute to the iconography and drawing style of the manga, even though it is presented through 3D CGI animation. But the imagery is simultaneously inspired by scenes from the Paris region, from a Renault production plant in Boulogne-Billancourt to a high school in Sceaux.

Code Lyoko represents how manga and anime, adapted with a few French twists, triumphed in France – even to the point of being teleported to living rooms in the United States, where the show dazzled at least one curious (and unsuspecting) college student, who could hardly have imagined that she would one day live in Paris.

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‘Visions’ Trailer Unveils Japanese Animated Series https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/ https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/#respond Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/ Sub or dub? You have to choose, Anakin! Well, that was meant to happen: Star wars became anime with his new series Star Wars: Visions. Reinvent the galaxy with #StarWarsVisions, an original series featuring stories from seven visionary Japanese animation studios, airing September 22 on @DisneyPlus. 1:00 p.m. – August 17, 2021 @starwars The Visions […]]]>

Sub or dub? You have to choose, Anakin!

Well, that was meant to happen: Star wars became anime with his new series Star Wars: Visions.

Reinvent the galaxy with #StarWarsVisions, an original series featuring stories from seven visionary Japanese animation studios, airing September 22 on @DisneyPlus.

@starwars

The Visions The series will feature nine episodes created by seven different Japanese animation studios.

There will be options to watch the dubbed version and the subtitled version.

Disney +

So which one will you choose?

The English dub is packed with talent: Lucy Liu, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Temuera Morrison, David Harbor, Neil Patrick Harris, George Takei and Alison Brie (to name a few).

That being said, I think I’ll stick with the captioned version. This is the first time that Japanese anime studios have got their hands on Star wars, so I want to fully live their way.

The artwork will wow people. I mean, seriously, just look at this picture:

Disney +

Check out this video posted on the show last month.

I also like the fact that we mostly get new characters. I can’t wait to find a new favorite character.

Will you watch Star Wars: Vision on Disney Plus on September 22? Comments below!

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Japanese anime fans wonder which Shonen Jump anime is the most entertaining https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-anime-fans-wonder-which-shonen-jump-anime-is-the-most-entertaining/ https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-anime-fans-wonder-which-shonen-jump-anime-is-the-most-entertaining/#respond Sat, 07 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-anime-fans-wonder-which-shonen-jump-anime-is-the-most-entertaining/ Is your favorite Weekly Shonen Jump anime to do list? Weekly Shonen Jump is possibly the most recognizable Japanese manga anthology magazine in the world, simply because it hosted some of Japan’s most famous series. Founded in 1968, the magazine is now over 50 years old and has serialized hundreds of manga, many of which […]]]>

Is your favorite Weekly Shonen Jump anime to do list?

Weekly Shonen Jump is possibly the most recognizable Japanese manga anthology magazine in the world, simply because it hosted some of Japan’s most famous series. Founded in 1968, the magazine is now over 50 years old and has serialized hundreds of manga, many of which have turned into anime that have achieved as much, if not more, fame and popularity.

It’s a lot of anime, so which ones are the best? 1,425 Japanese anime fans have voted and the results are in! Here are the top 10 most entertaining Shonen jump everyone’s anime time, according to the classification of Japanese otaku.

10. Town Hunter

Town hunter was one of the most popular anime of the 1980s, but with a recent blockbuster movie under its belt as well, it’s probably quite popular with young anime fans as well. Town hunter revolves around the antics of Ryo Saeba, a womanizer and private investigator, and Kaori Makimura, the tomboy sister of her murdered partner (whose untimely death is ranked by fans as one of the anime’s most notable ), while operating their one-stop shopping mall called “City Hunter”.

The original manga was serialized in Jump from 1985 to 1991, and the anime, premiered in 1987, became a huge hit across Asia. Its success has earned it several follow-up series, animated films, live-action movies, and live-action dramas from around the world, including a Hong Kong action comedy starring Jackie Chan.

9. Naruto

Arguably one of the most popular animes of the 2000s, Naruto can absolutely be considered one of the most quintessential “shonen” style anime. Combining thrilling fantasy action and slice of life, coming-of-age drama, everyone fell in love with Naruto and his dream of becoming a mighty ninja and the ruler of his village. Seriously, there’s a reason fans watched all 220 episodes of the original series and all 500 episodes in the sequel. Shuppuden series, and why they continue to watch the sequel on his son!

8. Yu Yu Hakusho

If you grew up in the 90s or early 90s, you are probably familiar with this anime. Although its 112 episodes originally aired in Japan from 1992 to 1994, it wasn’t until 2001 that it was licensed in the United States and uploaded to Cartoon Network for Western fans to enjoy. . The story of Yusuke, the teenager who died and brought back to life as a detective from the underworld to investigate supernatural events on earth, was so entertaining that those of us who watched him grow up still speak fondly. nowadays.

7. KochiKame: Tokyo beats the cops

Known as Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen Mae Hashutsujo in Japanese – a mouthful of a title that became a joke in its own way – this comedic anime was about a goofy cop and his misadventures in his Tokyo police station. It serialized for 40 years in Weekly Shonen Jump from September 1976 and his beloved anime lasted a total of 382 episodes between 1996 and 2004. Although Kochi Kame Perhaps less well-known abroad than some of the other heavyweights on this list, it has earned its ranking – and longevity – as one of the funniest and most heartfelt anime.

6. Slam Dunk

You didn’t think this list would go number one without a sports anime, did you? Slam dunk, arguably the most popular basketball manga, serialized for six years starting in 1990, then became an anime in 1993. With a cast of adorable misfits determined to win the National Championship for their team, this funny and full anime heart has gained consistent popularity throughout Asia and Europe and is considered one of the reasons basketball has become a popular sport in Japan.

5. One piece

How could we Jump list be complete without A play?! One of Jumpthe most successful franchises of all time, A play has become a cultural phenomenon and still maintains its popularity after 22 years and over 980 episodes (and more). Will the Straw Hat Pirates ever find the world’s ultimate treasure and crown their elastic-limbed captain Luffy as the Pirate King? We can’t help but keep watching to find out.

4. Haikyuu!

Haikyuu is a great story about two rival / friend volleyball players working to revitalize the once sterling reputation of their high school volleyball team. It’s newer than some of the other anime on this list, with the final seasons airing in 2020, but that doesn’t make it any less entertaining. Endearing, funny, and with sporting action right on the edge of your seat, there’s a good reason the anime is ranked as the fourth most interesting. Jump animated!

3. Dragon Ball

Here’s another series that, if you grew up watching anime in the 80s, 90s, or 2000s, would be one of the first Jump anime coming to mind. The Dragon ball The franchise has such an incredibly long reach that it spans four decades, 519 manga chapters, five animated series, 20 animated films, and three TV specials (plus one terrible Hollywood adaptation that we don’t like to talk about) . If you’ve watched it, you know how fun it is to watch Goku and his fellow fighters constantly fight against various powerful opponents for the safety of their planet. Seriously, the fun never ends (even when it sometimes seems like it should).

2. Demon Slayer: Kimestu no Yaiba

I’m sure at this point you’ve heard how amazing the success is Demon slayer is. Anime fans of all ages are heavily invested in Tanjiro Kamado’s journey to become a powerful demon slayer and learn how to save his sister Nezuko from becoming a full-fledged demon. With an interesting plot and some truly gorgeous imagery, it’s no wonder people love this anime. While this is by far the most recent series on the list, with its second season slated to air later this year, we have to admit that it’s probably one of, if not the Most popular anime of all time, if we are by the numbers.

1. Gintama

Beat surprisingly Demon slayer-but no surprise because it’s so good-Gintama takes the first place among anime fans as the most entertaining Shonen jump anime of all time. With a cast of great characters, a hint of comedy, Edo-era setting, samurai swordfights, and a hint of sci-fi in the form of alien conquerors, who wouldn’t think so? It’s also relatively new, although originally made into an OVA in 2005, the full 367-episode anime aired from 2006 to 2018, and the third movie just released this year. Maybe this recent impact has put it at the top of the list… but given its popularity, we’re inclined to say that’s not the only factor involved.

Who Jump animes would you put on your list? Have you seen it all? Otherwise… you have work to do! And while you’re on the hunt for the best anime to watch, check out the anime that makes fans cry the most and the top 10 anime that ended 10 years ago as well. This way you will be fully in the know.

Source: Goo ranking via livedoor news
Top image © SoraNews24

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Songs from the hit Japanese anime ‘Belle’ that you should be listening to right now https://mazingerz-world.com/songs-from-the-hit-japanese-anime-belle-that-you-should-be-listening-to-right-now/ https://mazingerz-world.com/songs-from-the-hit-japanese-anime-belle-that-you-should-be-listening-to-right-now/#respond Mon, 02 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/songs-from-the-hit-japanese-anime-belle-that-you-should-be-listening-to-right-now/ A few weeks ago, Studio Chizu’s latest anime from director Mamoru Hosoda made headlines after the film received a 14-minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival. There’s a lot about the film that makes it commendable, from its sensational visuals to its timely message about how we interact in the digital age. However, it […]]]>

A few weeks ago, Studio Chizu’s latest anime from director Mamoru Hosoda made headlines after the film received a 14-minute standing ovation at the Cannes Film Festival. There’s a lot about the film that makes it commendable, from its sensational visuals to its timely message about how we interact in the digital age. However, it is the film’s haunting soundtrack that makes it truly memorable.

A playlist of songs from the film was recently posted on Spotify. In addition, the best tracks were also uploaded to YouTube, along with their own original music videos. ‘Belle’ is now hitting theaters across Japan, but if you haven’t watched it yet, it’s still worth listening to these four chart hits for a little taste of what will happen.

Millenium Parade – U

This firecracker from a theme song produced by the musical collective Millenium Parade kicks off with a bang. This clip, which has accumulated nearly 10 million views since its first release, plunges us directly into the virtual world of ‘U’ where we are struck by a sensory overload of colors and strange characters. The song’s music and lyrics are by Daiki Tsuneta while the vocals are performed by singer-songwriter Kaho Nakamura, who performs Suzu / Belle in the film.


Hanabare no Kimi and part 1

This melodic piece has a slightly different flavor to the main theme of the film, with mellow piano notes and a hint of nostalgia in the vocals. The accompanying video clip features live action visuals shot in Kochi Prefecture where the film is set and includes some of the locations Hosoda used as references for the film.


Kokoro no Soba ni

It’s no secret that Hosoda’s film is partially inspired by the 1991 Disney animation “Beauty and the Beast”, in which the main character is also called Belle. In this uplifting lyrical video, you’ll instantly recognize some of the visual similarities between the two animations as Beauty and the Beast (a dragon called Ryu) share a dance in a castle and float across the starry sky.


Uta yo

In this raw clip, Kaho Nakamura puts a different spin on a song she wrote for ‘Belle’. As if performing for herself, Nakamura sings about loneliness while trying to find solace in music – a sentiment also expressed by her character, Suzu.

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Thief steals thousands of dollars worth of rare Japanese anime figurines from Madison Heights store https://mazingerz-world.com/thief-steals-thousands-of-dollars-worth-of-rare-japanese-anime-figurines-from-madison-heights-store/ https://mazingerz-world.com/thief-steals-thousands-of-dollars-worth-of-rare-japanese-anime-figurines-from-madison-heights-store/#respond Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/thief-steals-thousands-of-dollars-worth-of-rare-japanese-anime-figurines-from-madison-heights-store/ Thief steals rare anime figures from Madison Heights store A thief broke into Otaku Detroit and filled a bag with rare Japanese anime figures. MADISON HEIGHTS, Michigan (FOX 2) – A thief used a crowbar to break into a Madison Heights store and steal thousands of dollars worth of rare Japanese anime figurines on Thursday […]]]>

A thief used a crowbar to break into a Madison Heights store and steal thousands of dollars worth of rare Japanese anime figurines on Thursday morning.

Dressed in black and armed with a crowbar and bag, the thief broke into Otaku Detroit on 11 Mile Road. They left with a bag full of figurines and went inside for the cash register.

Matt Lapoint said his store had $ 7,000 worth of rare figurines.

“It’s not like they’re stealing things that I can order from a distributor,” he said. “They took everything that was collectable and hard to find.”

Lapoint said the thief must be someone who knows the niche hobby. He said he had several friends who owned pawn shops in the area, so he asked them to keep an eye out for stolen items.

He said his store had just celebrated its first anniversary after opening during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“So we are still hand to mouth with our finances,” he said. “I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

Lapoint said if it is able to reopen it will add a security system, cameras and possibly bars to windows to prevent future thefts.


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