japanese anime – Mazingerz World http://mazingerz-world.com/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 08:38:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mazingerz-world.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/anime.png japanese anime – Mazingerz World http://mazingerz-world.com/ 32 32 Japanese anime turns to WWII stories – here are three to watch https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-anime-turns-to-wwii-stories-here-are-three-to-watch/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/japanese-anime-turns-to-wwii-stories-here-are-three-to-watch/ If you’re a fan of the anime genre, you’ve probably seen a lot of Japanese anime series ranging from One Piece to Cowboy Bebop to Dragon Ball Z or maybe newer series like Tokyo Ghoul and Attack on Titan. They have unique and interesting storylines, and it’s quite easy to get hooked. If you’re a […]]]>

If you’re a fan of the anime genre, you’ve probably seen a lot of Japanese anime series ranging from One Piece to Cowboy Bebop to Dragon Ball Z or maybe newer series like Tokyo Ghoul and Attack on Titan. They have unique and interesting storylines, and it’s quite easy to get hooked. If you’re a fan of historical movies and shows, you might want to check out these three animated movies set during World War II.

This list was voted by private soldierof the anime community. As they wrote, “Take a trip back in time when the world was at war and get a new perspective on what happened from a different vantage point.”

In this corner of the world

The plot of In This Corner of The World takes place ten years before the Hiroshima bombing in the 1930s-1940s and is based on a manga. The story focuses on a cheerful woman named Suzu who lives near Hiroshima in a town called Eba and how her life is thrown into chaos after World War II. It also shows how she, as a housewife, helps her family prepare before the bombing and how she regains her passion for life after the Hiroshima bombing.

The film was produced by MAPPA and premiered in Japan on November 12, 2016. In 2017, the anime was released in the United States.

The wind picks up

This 2013 animated historical drama film was animated by Studio Ghibli. It became the highest-grossing Japanese film in Japan in 2013 and received numerous awards and accolades.

The story is a fictional film from the life of Jori Horikoshi, the designer of the Mitsubishi A5M and A6M Zero fighter jets. The plot is about Jori and how he becomes a fighter jet designer after his myopia prevents him from fulfilling his childhood dream of being a pilot. It also shows his romance with Naoko, a lady he met on a train en route to Tokyo Imperial University.

the Grave of the Fireflies

Another anime that was brought to life by Studio Ghibli, Grave of the Fireflies, is based on the 1967 semi-autobiographical short story written by novelist Akiyuki Nosaka. The story is set in 1945 and focuses on the struggles of 14-year-old Seita and her four-year-old sister Setsuko during World War II bombings that begin when their mother dies from severe burns. in an incendiary bomb attack in the city of Kobe. .

These three films are interesting because they come from the point of view of the Japanese during this war, a point of view which presents them as victims rather than aggressors in their part of the Second World War. In the years since the end of the war, the Japanese have often been accused of romanticizing their own suffering in this conflict while blatantly ignoring the atrocities committed by their government against millions of Chinese, Filipino and Korean civilians in the territory that they conquered. In the American version of World War II history, we tend to forget that Japan attacked not only the United States, but also the Philippines, Malaysia, Borneo, Australia, Indochina France, the Dutch East Indies, Burma and Thailand, and this while they were waging an ongoing war in which they had conquered a third of China.

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Have you ever watched the Japanese anime Guilty Crown? https://mazingerz-world.com/have-you-ever-watched-the-japanese-anime-guilty-crown/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 05:30:39 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/have-you-ever-watched-the-japanese-anime-guilty-crown/ For a long time, Guilty crown has been on everyone’s radar. It was certain that Guilty Crown, run by the same guy who brought us anime classics like Death Note and Attack on Titan, would be a series we could step into and enjoy. Unfortunately, the more we watched, the less we cared about the […]]]>


For a long time, Guilty crown has been on everyone’s radar. It was certain that Guilty Crown, run by the same guy who brought us anime classics like Death Note and Attack on Titan, would be a series we could step into and enjoy. Unfortunately, the more we watched, the less we cared about the series.

Guilty Crown is a Japanese anime from 2011 television series directed by Production IG which premiered on Fuji TV’s production block on October 13, 2011. The plot centers on Shu Ouma, a high school student who obtains the “power of the king”, which allows him to take out items known as “Voids” to other people.

He is soon embroiled in a fight between the GHQ, a quasi-government group, and Funeral Parlor, a rebel movement seeking to regain Japanese independence from the GHQ. Shu must contend with the load that his talent places on his shoulders as well as the terrible mystery of his history during this process.

Read more: Awkwafina is Nora from Queens Season 2: Up And Up

What’s in Guilty Crown?

Shu Ouma, a high school student from the Roppongi district of Tokyo, meets Inori Yuzuriha, the singer of the famous online group Egoist, who is seeking refuge in the studio of his film club. The GHQ anti-bodies attack the workshop and arrest him for his participation in the funeral home. Shu follows the coordinates of Inori’s robot to a drop zone, where he meets Gai Tsutsugami, the commander of the funeral home, who asks him to protect a vial.

Shu rushes to save Inori as she is attacked by GHQ Endlave mechs while the Anti-Bodies attack the Roppongi neighborhood in search of the vial, which shatters. The Void Genome, a formidable genetic weapon produced from the Apocalypse virus, grants Shu the “power of the king,” enabling him to extract voids, psyche-based weapons in physical form, to the using his right hand. Shu then removes and destroys Inori’s Void.

Shu falls in love with Inori, who bears a remarkable resemblance to his late sister, Mana, after choosing to join the funeral home. However, after killing a classmate’s younger brother during one of his missions, he flees the gang. The funeral home tries to pick up the meteorite that triggered the GHQ Apocalypse virus outbreak while Shu is away.

Gai and his soldiers are caught in the crossfire as the Anti-Bodies slaughter their numbers with a “genetic resonance” broadcast that spreads the virus throughout Tokyo. In the midst of the pandemonium, Shichir Keido, the anti-corps commander, takes control of the GHQ and aims to eradicate the remains of the funeral home.

Read more: Shadow in the Cloud: Should You Watch It?

What is so interesting about Guilty Crown

The team’s goal was to create “the next generation of anime with this program” during production of the series. They wanted it to be an original animation rather than a remake for it. Regardless of all the obstacles, the team wanted it to be a “two-season show”. The main premise of the show is “Japanese style, a Japanese notion, and that’s what sets it apart from other shows.”

When asked if Neon Genesis Evangelion protagonist Shu and Shinji Ikari have any parallels, the staff replied that they were both passive characters, even though they thought Shinji was more passive.

When asked why he was involved, Redjuice explained that the artists and animators on the production team believed his concept work was consistent with the end result. While Supercell’s Ryo provided the show’s insertion tracks, Redjuice did not participate in production as a member of Supercell. In addition to worshiping Inori, the main heroine of Guilty Crown, Redjuice has stated that he has drawn Tsugumi on several occasions.

The team had no objection to Tsugumi’s cat ears, so Redjuice believes he introduced his own preferences to the show. Redjuice loves Kanon, despite the fact that she was not originally included in the script. Because Redjuice had little experience with 3D CG, he was able to learn a lot from the Production IG team.

Guilty Crown was directed by Tetsuro Araki, with Hiroyuki Yoshino and Ichiro Kouchi in charge of script supervision for the series. Jin Hanegaya of Nitroplus will also contribute writing. Atsushi Takeuchi was in charge of the mechanical design, while Y Moriyama was in charge of the design of the accessories. Redjuice created the original character designs, with Hiromi Kat contributing to the anime character designs. The artistic director of the anime was Yusuke Takeda. Division 6 of Production IG was in charge of the animation.

Read more: – The Vow Season 2: is it coming back?

Wrap

The series has met with mixed reviews from critics. The show’s daring to rework its premise was praised by Carl Kimlinger of the Anime News Network, although the plot was criticized as muddled and maintained the trend of poor characters and clichés. THEM Anime Reviews’ Aiden Foote agreed with Kimlinger on the layout and narrative, but noted that the characters are not likable and have shallow backstories.



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How to watch Japanese anime online in 2021? https://mazingerz-world.com/how-to-watch-japanese-anime-online-in-2021/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/how-to-watch-japanese-anime-online-in-2021/ Anime is described as a type of lively Japanese artistic expression aimed at both adults and children, which is a fascinating concept to grasp in this situation. Several topics are covered in these different forms of anime. Each type is said to appeal to a specific group of people, which changes over time. There is […]]]>


Anime is described as a type of lively Japanese artistic expression aimed at both adults and children, which is a fascinating concept to grasp in this situation. Several topics are covered in these different forms of anime. Each type is said to appeal to a specific group of people, which changes over time. There is also so much customization to be observed in the case of anime, which is why there are so many different forms of anime internationally, and this needs to be considered from the start. It is essential to remember in this scenario that there are a variety of topics known to hold the audience’s interest, and the majority of anime shows prefer to touch them. As a result, people are increasingly interested in them. However, there are some anime streaming websites that they need to know about.

The call of the anime

The popularity of the anime has skyrocketed over the years, which is very understandable. What’s important to understand is that most people these days want to view things electronically. This is accomplished through the use of the Internet. As a result, people tend to look for choices where they can quickly watch anime, which should be taken into account. It is a worldwide trend that anime is mostly seen on various types of streaming sites available on the internet, and it should be understood with caution in this situation. As a result, the anime can be accessed anytime and from any location in the world. All they need is a fast and stable internet connection, and they’ll be good to go on their streaming adventure, which is quite fascinating.

The anime is primarily based on the idea of ​​conveying a narrative from a unique perspective. This is observed to please many people, and it should be stated here with due diligence. As an art, it is subjective. As a result, it caters to a global audience with sophisticated tastes that need to be catered for properly and without any difficulty to be viewed. These streaming sites can give people a taste of history as well as an understanding of Japanese culture. It is essential to have a clear understanding of cultural fairness, and people should do everything possible to do so. These streaming services are extremely innovative, allowing individuals to access a wide range of sites. Everyone must understand them.

Ways to Watch Japanese Anime Online

Amazon prime video This is yet another popular and legal alternative to explore. A large number of people around the world are using the Amazon Prime membership because of the many benefits it offers, including access to movies. This is a great feature because it allows users to quickly find the anime they want. It is well known that people like to make choices and express their discretion in the widest possible way.

YouTube – This is the best possible alternative for people who want to watch for free legally. Even though the possibilities seem limited in this situation, the number of potential options to be seen here is vast and can meet a wide range of tastes among individuals. This must be taken into account from the outset with diligence and honesty.

Hulu- There are hundreds of anime titles available here, both recent and vintage. Classic anime appeals to a wide range of individuals, but sometimes it’s difficult to get them legally. Fortunately, with the help of the Hulu website, people can watch all of their favorite old anime series without having to search for them.

Netflix – Without a doubt, this is the best option for people. Netflix is ​​now available in virtually every country on the planet and continues to expand into new markets every day. With a subscription, you can watch a wide variety of anime. Everyone will find his account. There are several genres to choose from, and this is what interests most people and should be understood by everyone. So, people can be ready to go on their anime watching adventure with just one subscription.

Crunchyroll – This is an emerging site to note in this case, primarily because the options available here are endless. People can watch as much anime as they want. There is nothing to stop them at all. The possibilities are endless, so are the genres.

Conclusion

To sum up, then, it is obvious in this regard that the popularity of the anime has grown exponentially over the years, which is truly natural to note. What is extremely important to understand is that now most people tend to view content virtually. This is therefore done on the internet. Therefore, their tendency to seek out options where they can easily watch cartoons on time should be noted carefully here. The article explored a few possible options here.


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Jerusalem-inspired Japanese anime hits the big screen in Israel https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/ https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 13:35:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel/ Cars drive on a highway as a train enters a station in Tel Aviv, Israel on November 25, 2018. Photo taken on November 25, 2018. REUTERS / Corinna Kern JNS.org – Not just Naruto and Dragon Ball: “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors […]]]>


Cars drive on a highway as a train enters a station in Tel Aviv, Israel on November 25, 2018. Photo taken on November 25, 2018. REUTERS / Corinna Kern

JNS.org – Not just Naruto and Dragon Ball: “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE The Divine Realm of the Roundtable: Wandering Camelot; Agateram.

The film is based on the free-to-play “Fate / Grand Order” (FGO) mobile game.

Although not available in app stores in Israel, FGO launched in 2015 and has over 42 million downloads. It also spawned an empire of spinoffs and branded products, including TV series, Manga comics, and even theatrical productions in Tokyo and Osaka.

The brand has essentially been so successful in Japan that it’s even compared to Pokemon Go.

Now, amid the growing popularity of the anime genre in Israel, thanks in large part to TikTok, Israeli theaters are bringing the film to the big screen. The connection to Israel goes beyond mere commerce, however, as it is relevant to the plot of the story, which takes place in Jerusalem in 1273, when an evil king threatens to destroy the holy city and transform it. in the desert.


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Jerusalem-inspired Japanese anime hits the big screen in Israel https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel-2/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 09:07:12 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jerusalem-inspired-japanese-anime-hits-the-big-screen-in-israel-2/ (November 1, 2021 / Israel Hayom) Not Just Naruto and Dragon Ball: The “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film. hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE Divine Kingdom of the […]]]>


Not Just Naruto and Dragon Ball: The “Yes Planet” and “Rav Hen Dizengoff” cinemas in Tel Aviv this weekend were painted in the vibrant colors of Japanese anime in honor of a special screening of the film. hit animation, “Fate / Grand Order THE MOVIE Divine Kingdom of the Round Table: Camelot Errant; Agateram.

The film is based on the free-to-play “Fate / Grand Order” (FGO) mobile game.

Although not available in app stores in Israel, FGO launched in 2015 and has over 42 million downloads. It also spawned an empire of spinoffs and branded products, including TV series, Manga comics, and even theatrical productions in Tokyo and Osaka.

The brand has essentially been so successful in Japan that it’s even compared to Pokemon Go.

Now, amid the growing popularity of the anime genre in Israel, thanks in large part to TikTok, Israeli theaters are bringing the film to the big screen.

The connection to Israel goes beyond mere commerce, however, as it is relevant to the plot of the story, which takes place in Jerusalem in 1273 when an evil king threatens to destroy the holy city and turn it into a desert.

This report first appeared in Israel Hayom.


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The ambitions of director Itoso Kenji for Japanese anime https://mazingerz-world.com/the-ambitions-of-director-itoso-kenji-for-japanese-anime/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/the-ambitions-of-director-itoso-kenji-for-japanese-anime/ Film and animation director Itoso Kenji is bursting with ambition as he describes his vision for the future. “These days, it’s possible to bring together 1,000 people simultaneously on Zoom to see how Japanese anime are drawn, produced and expressed.” But it’s not just about participating online. Itoso devised a detailed strategy to create a […]]]>


Film and animation director Itoso Kenji is bursting with ambition as he describes his vision for the future. “These days, it’s possible to bring together 1,000 people simultaneously on Zoom to see how Japanese anime are drawn, produced and expressed.” But it’s not just about participating online. Itoso devised a detailed strategy to create a new order in the animation industry in Japan.

From Miyazaki’s tutelage to the top

After studying with acclaimed Studio Ghibli director Miyazaki Hayao in his teens, Itoso Kenji was chosen by several famous directors and producers to produce their works. For animated feature films Colubocoro and Santa Claus Company: The Secret of Christmas, both released in 2019, it abandons the customary model of the production committee and sets up a structure giving it full ownership of the copyright of the work. Itoso is not only a gifted creator, but his keen business acumen has breathed new life into the world of Japanese animation. He’s a shrewd strategist who managed to raise a cumulative 850 million yen through crowdfunding, a feat that earned him a place in the Guinness World Records.

Itoso wears many different hats: film director, university professor and business executive.

The weekly manga magazine Shônen jump was at its peak during Itoso’s childhood. All of his friends were avid readers of the magazine, but Itoso’s parents thought it was a bad educational influence and kept him away from him. A kid who refuses this kind of entertainment can usually pout or make a fuss, but instead Itoso decided that he would come up with interesting stories that no one else knew and started making his own manga, on the model Dragon ball, his favorite story.

As a young teenager, Itoso was crazy about football, but realized that he was not talented enough to become a professional player. Thinking about his future, at the age of 17, he decided to become a manga artist and left his native Hiroshima to attend Tokyo Zōkei University of Art.

Some of his teachers were also involved in creating anime, and by listening to them talk he became convinced that he should move on to the field. This was around the time Miyazaki Hayao announced his (short-term) retirement after the 1997 release of Princess mononoke, and Itoso learned that Studio Ghibli will be auditioning candidates for its Higashi Koganei Son Juku seminars, created to nurture the next generation of anime artists.

As part of his strategy to earn a spot at the seminar, Itoso watched several Studio Ghibli animated films up close. He found that while Miyazaki’s name didn’t appear in the end credits as a character creator, each work unmistakably reflected his distinctive touch.

Itoso decided that was either because the staff’s designs had been retouched to give them the signature Miyazaki flavor, or they were so devoted to Miyazaki that their production subconsciously reflected his style. In any case, Itoso was convinced that the only way to get a foot in the door would be to submit designs with a Miyazaki flavor. He had also noted that crucial scenes in Miyazaki films often showed close-ups of female characters in profile. He followed this practice to the letter, submitting watercolors of women in profile incorporating his own touches, and successfully passed the audition.

Itoso created this watercolor as part of his seminar audition portfolio.
Itoso created this watercolor as part of his seminar audition portfolio.

During the seminary, Itoso spent all of his time with the then retired Miyazaki, who devoted many hours to supervising the students of the seminary. Luckily, plans for a Ghibli museum were underway at the time, and Itoso was asked to create storyboards for short films that would be shown there exclusively. Through repeated discussions of visualization in films, he absorbed the view of nature symbolically represented in Miyazaki’s works.

“Do it now, not a day”

Colubocoro, a work Itoso premiered in 2007 but which only hit theaters in 2019, will be a centerpiece of his work. He believed that a work by a stranger would be difficult to publicize and would attract little attention anyway. He decided that an animated film made in the Ghibli style by someone who had studied with Miyazaki would provide the necessary hook, and the work he created incorporated elements from the Studio Ghibli films. Kiki’s delivery service, My neighbor Totoro, and Laputa: Castle in the Sky.

Just as he had planned, Itoso gradually started to gain attention in the anime industry. In 2010, producer and founder of Madhouse production company Maruyama Masao approached him to participate in the production of Dream machine, an animated film directed by Kon Satoshi. The offer was a precious opportunity to get involved in this ambitious work, the fruit of leading creators. But shortly after production started, Kon was diagnosed with end-stage pancreatic cancer.

One day Kon asked Itoso if he had ever wondered why he was drawing. Itoso replied that he hoped to one day create his own original work. Kon retorted, “‘A day’ may never come, and you may end up dying before that. Forget “someday”, do it now. Take care and bring me some suggestions.

Kon brushed aside most of Itoso’s ideas but thought that Santa Claus Company could make an interesting movie. The storyline, that Santa Claus can deliver gifts overnight because his operation is actually a business, was originally a manga written by Itoso.

Kon died in August 2010. The Dream machine the project ran out of money and was eventually disbanded, so the film was never made. But spurred on by Kon’s ‘do it right now’ in 2014, Itoso turned to crowdfunding, an unusual move at the time, to make the short. Santa Claus Company.

An extended version of the film, to which new scenes were added to deepen the storyline, hit theaters in 2019, voiced by lead voice actors Hanazawa Kana and Kaji YÅ«ki.

“Kaji and Hanazawa are both hot stars, and they were only available for a short time to record their games,” Itoso explains. “It only took Kaji an hour and a half to express an hour of dialogue. I gave him direction and we did several tests, but once he figured out what I wanted he did it all in one take. He is a master of his trade. And while we recorded the roles of the two actors separately, the scenes where the characters are laughing or getting angry sync up perfectly. I was really impressed with their professional work.

Breaking the mold

In a different vein, Itoso plans to use scenes from voice actors recording their parts as educational material for aspiring animators or voice actors.

“Take a commercial product like Doraemon, for example. All elements of the work, from the illustrations and animations of the characters to the colorful images produced later in the process, are protected by copyright, and even vocational schools and universities cannot use them to teach their students. animation students. But I structured Santa Claus Company so that my studio owns all the copyrights, and if I wanted, I could download a hard drive with all the data on the internet tomorrow.

It would also create material for students to practice, karaoke-like, with prominent Japanese comedians by simply blocking the audio track of a certain character. Itoso says he has already gotten the green light from the actors in his works to use their scenes.

In his role as head of the art and design department at Osaka Seikei University, Itoso visits an affiliated school in Taiwan several times a year to lecture and coach animation students. “The first time I stood in front of a class, I was surprised to see students smile at my remarks, before the interpreter even started speaking, so I asked the students if they understood Japanese. About half of them said they had done so; they had learned the language of the anime. For Itoso, it was clear that Japanese anime had a huge impact abroad.

Itoso travels to Taiwan several times a year to teach animation students at Tainan University of Technology, a sister school of Osaka Seikei University.
Itoso travels to Taiwan several times a year to teach animation students at Tainan University of Technology, a sister school of Osaka Seikei University.

He hopes to keep this sharing in motion. “Right now, Japanese anime skills are in the foreground and there are Japanese anime fans all over the world. Whenever I talk about what’s going on in an animation studio, there is a great deal of interest. I’m not interested in keeping the secrets of the anime to myself. With online tools like YouTube or Zoom, it’s easy to show how Japanese voice actors work, and people all over the world can join in at the same time. Any anime fan who participates in an online session can later recall how the scenes ended up in the finished product when watching an animated film.

He continues, “If possible, I would like to make an animated film working with people outside of Japan, not just creators but also fans. And anyone who has contributed to a crowdfunding campaign could have the satisfaction of seeing their name in the credits as a donor. Letting people feel that they have been actively involved is also a great way to get the word out. It is also free advertising.

Itoso has a grander vision than just doing Santa Claus Company a success in Japan. He aims to make his mark on the world stage.

(Originally published in Japanese. Banner photo: Director Itoso Kenji with a poster of Santa Claus Company. Photo by the author. Poster © Kenji Studio, 2019. Photos courtesy of Itoso Kenji, unless otherwise noted.)


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Samurai and lightsabers! Star Wars meets Japanese anime in ‘Star Wars: Visions’ https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/ https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/samurai-and-lightsabers-star-wars-meets-japanese-anime-in-star-wars-visions/ All Star wars a fan worth his Craitian salt would know that one of George Lucas’ greatest inspirations for the film was the iconic 1958 film by legendary Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa The hidden fortress. This isn’t the only time the Star Wars franchise has drawn inspiration from Japan. Samurai-influenced elements of Darth Vader’s Helmet […]]]>


All Star wars a fan worth his Craitian salt would know that one of George Lucas’ greatest inspirations for the film was the iconic 1958 film by legendary Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa The hidden fortress.

This isn’t the only time the Star Wars franchise has drawn inspiration from Japan. Samurai-influenced elements of Darth Vader’s Helmet and Jedi Honor Code, Obi-Wan Kenobi’s final one-shot duel with Darth Maul in Star Wars Rebels, the entire Star Wars franchise is peppered with influences from Japanese culture and films.

But what if it was the other way around? What kind of stories Star wars inspire Japanese filmmakers, especially anime producers, to do?

This is the main concept behind Star Wars: Visions, an anthology of nine anime episodes produced by seven different Japanese animation studios, each bringing their own narrative and visual style to the board. These include Production IG, best known for the iconic Ghost in the shell, and Kamikaze Douga, known for his work on JoJo’s bizarre adventure lively.

Star Wars: Visions is an anthology of nine animated episodes produced by seven different Japanese animation studios. From Star Wars Visions short ‘The Elder. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

According to Star Wars: Visions executive producer James Waugh, anime is something that has always influenced everyone behind the Star Wars franchise.

“We are all huge fans of anime. This is something that has really influenced a lot of us… you can see it in a lot of the work that has been done at Lucasfilm, ”he said in a recent video panel interview with regional media.

“The whole point of creating the Visions framework was to allow this kind of fun and festive storytelling to exist alongside any of our proven animations, ”he added.

Lucasfilm has selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a filmmaking medium.  - Photo: Disney + HotstarLucasfilm has selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a filmmaking medium. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

According to producer Kanako Shirasaki, who previously worked on Netflix Eden animated series, Visions It’s not just about Japanese filmmakers creating Japanese Star Wars stories, as each studio also has filmmakers from different cultures.

For example, she explains, The dual by Kamikaze Douga has a very “Kurosawa movie aesthetic” and is a “Samurai Meets Star Wars short”. Other episodes, like that of Eunyoung Choi Akakiri, is the Korean director’s take on Japanese cinema, animation and Star Wars.

“Abel Góngora (who directed the droid-centric T0-B1) is a Spanish director who creates Japanese anime in Japan!” She said. “You can see a lot of different cultural aspects (in Visions) … so these are their interpretations of Japanese culture, ”she said.

“T0-B1” is directed by Spanish director Abel Góngora. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

While the episodes are available in their original Japanese dialogue (and English subtitles), it’s worth watching them in English as well, as the series features a stellar vocal cast that includes the likes of Temuera Morrison (who play Jango fett in the Star Wars prequel films and Boba Fett in The Mandalorian and the next one Boba Fett’s book), George Takei, Simu Liu, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Neil Patrick Harris, Lucy Liu, Karen Fukuhara and even the Malaysian Henry Golding.

Lucasfilm is notoriously strict when it comes to every aspect of the Star Wars franchise, from the continuity of the stories to the number of buttons on Darth Vader’s chest, but for Visions, they gave free rein to the anime studios to do whatever they wanted.

“We approached Visions of a very festive place. It was a setting for creators to explore whatever element of the galaxy they love and tell their stories in their medium, ”says Waugh.

This is the cutest Jabba The Hutt we've seen so far.  Extract from the episode This is the cutest Jabba The Hutt we’ve seen so far. Excerpt from the episode “Tatooine Rhapsody” from Star Wars: Vision. – Photo: Disney + Hotstar

He adds that the studios’ initial brief was that they weren’t looking for “deep stories” that tell the origin of a specific character or a defining story about a known character, but more original stories.

“We wanted to know what they could do if all bets were off, and they could just use whatever Star Wars elements they wanted!” he said.

Ultimately, Waugh said, they selected a diverse group of studios that have been successful in showcasing the breadth of anime as a medium for filmmaking.

“We selected these studios in a place of love because we are really fans of a lot of their work. They all did something a little differently. (Some) told quieter stories or more heartfelt stories or more romantic stories, and others are just bombastic action … we wanted it all! ” he said.

Star Wars: Visions is currently airing on Disney + Hotstar.


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Jordan Fisher on the challenges of dubbing Japanese anime into English https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/ https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/jordan-fisher-on-the-challenges-of-dubbing-japanese-anime-into-english/ He also talks about how he keeps his voice fresh when working on Broadway. With the anime anthology series Star Wars: Visions now streaming on Disney +, I recently spoke with Jordan fisher about voicing one of the characters in the episode titled Wool. During the interview, Fisher spoke about what she was told about […]]]>


He also talks about how he keeps his voice fresh when working on Broadway.


Interview of Jordan-Fisher-Star Wars visions on social networks

With the anime anthology series Star Wars: Visions now streaming on Disney +, I recently spoke with Jordan fisher about voicing one of the characters in the episode titled Wool. During the interview, Fisher spoke about what she was told about her episode and her character before signing, what people would be surprised to learn about the voice recording process, how though you match the Japanese dubbing, you have the freedom with your delivery, and Continued. Plus, he explained how he keeps his voice fresh and works when performing on Broadway.

If you haven’t seen the trailer, Star Wars: Visions brings together seven Japanese anime studios for nine standalone stories that take place at different points in the Star wars universe. Each studio uses its own style of animation and storytelling to offer episodes ranging from 13 to 22 minutes and featuring all types of characters and locations. If you are an anime fan and Star wars, you must push the reading on these episodes immediately.

star-wars-visions-trailer-image-5

Image via Disney +

RELATED: ‘Star Wars: Visions’ Review: The Far, Far Galaxy Has Never Been More Exciting

Take a look at what he had to say in the player above and below, this is exactly what we talked about and the

Jordan fisher

  • What’s cooler: Win Dancing with the stars or be a voice in Star wars?

  • How he is a huge fan of anime.

  • I jokingly ask how much he paid to be on the show.

  • What could he see from his episode before he dropped his voice?

  • How, even if you match the Japanese dub, you have the freedom of delivery.

  • What would people be surprised to learn about the voice recording process?

  • What’s the secret to keeping your voice fresh when performing on Broadway?

star-wars-visions-trailer-social-2


Interview with Masi-Oka's Star Wars Visions

Masi Oka on ‘Star Wars: Visions’ and the difference between Japanese and American dubbing

He also teases what it was like to be a part of David Leitch’s assassin movie “Bullet Train”.

Read more


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Manga Mon Amour: On the French passion for Japanese anime https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/ https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/manga-mon-amour-on-the-french-passion-for-japanese-anime/ PARIS – When I was in sixth grade, Cartoon Network aired episodes of the TV show Code Lyoko almost everyday around 3pm I was a loyal fan – I watched pretty much every day when I got home from school. In the show, a group of teenagers engage in a virtual battle against a virus-like […]]]>


PARIS – When I was in sixth grade, Cartoon Network aired episodes of the TV show Code Lyoko almost everyday around 3pm I was a loyal fan – I watched pretty much every day when I got home from school.

In the show, a group of teenagers engage in a virtual battle against a virus-like artificial intelligence force that threatens to wreak havoc in the physical world. If I had to categorize it, I would loosely place it in the “anime-influenced western animation series” box. Little informed as I was, I had simply assumed that the series was a true Japanese anime, when in reality it was a French animated television series. Fast forward a decade: I had just moved to the Paris area and started working as an English teacher in college. Around halfway through the day, it was time for free reading. As I was telling my students to get their reading material out, I was struck by the fact that, one by one, virtually all of them released the same thing: Manga.

This mainstream status in France surprised me after my experience in an American college, where being a fan of manga (or anime) was generally frowned upon. If you were looking to gain popularity, your favorite book might be the Sorority of travel pants, or the Ugly series. The manga was more of a niche interest and, as such, was often seen as “bizarre,” perhaps indicating some latent xenophobia. And yet here are my French students – those who yearn for freshness and wallflowers – avidly leafing through their copies of Demon slayer Where A play.

Of course, in recent years, anime and manga have become more popular in the United States. Celebrities like Kim Kardashian and Michael B Jordan are open fans, much to the chagrin of those who hate the idea of ​​the genre being overtaken by “normies”. But in France, the story is quite different. Anime and manga are extremely popular and have long held a special place in them, as a recent article by The world.

“You just have to look up and you will see it everywhere in the school,” Solal, a 16-year-old high school student in Brittany, told the French daily. “Tons of people wear cartoon-inspired t-shirts or sweaters. Some people even have phone cases with characters from their favorite series, while others can be a bit more low-key and just have cartoons on their computer screen. “

The manga has actually gone beyond the traditional comic book style, becoming the most popular comic book sold in France.

France is in fact ranked second among consumers of manga outside of Japan. And it’s a love story that goes back decades, to 1978 to be precise, when it first appeared on public television as an after-school series.

Young viewers tapped into the public television channel of a production group called Club Dorothée to watch series such as Grendizer Where Maya the Bee. These low budget shows would pave the way for well-known shows like Dragon balland Sailor moon. Interestingly, the anime as a genre originally encountered a backlash, as opponents decried the genre’s tendency to over-sexualize the characters and portray too much gore and violence. And yet in some ways the bad press served to make the anime more popular, and as the anime took off, so did the manga.

France was already fertile ground for the manga market given its rich history of graphic novels, or as they are called in French: comics (BD for short). Cultural phenomena like The Adventures of Tintin (1929) and Asterix (1959) left their mark on generations of French people, some in France even qualifying comics as “9th Art”. Each year, France hosts the Angoulême International Comics Festival, the second comic strip festival in Europe and the third in the world, after the Comiket festival in Japan. Several French government officials attend the event each year, and in 2019 Franck Riester, a former Minister of Culture, even gave a speech where he compared the importance of the Comic Strip Festival to that of the Festival de Cannes at the cinema.

France was already fertile ground for the manga market given its rich history of graphic novels – Photo: Visual / ZUMA Wire

So converting to manga wasn’t such a big demand for a culture that was already in love with comics. But in 2005, the manga surpassed the traditional comic book style, becoming the most popular comic sold in France. And as manga and anime took hold of France, the French began to create their own comics and series – French-style. Publishers who have sought to create manga “à la française”, or Manfras, tend to feature artwork inspired by Japanese manga while sometimes featuring left-to-right reading styles or incorporating a bandaged design-hard cover style. Their popularity is also growing, both in France and in Japan, as evidenced by the success of Radiant, a French comic strip written and illustrated by Tony Valente, and published by Ankama, the French entertainment company.

Satoko Inaba, editorial director of the publishing house, said Glénat The world that publishing houses have been inundated with requests for publication in this style. “We have loads of projects coming up,” he said.

It’s here that Code Lyoko, the show that caught my eye so much as an 11-year-old fits in perfectly. Created by French animators Thomas Romain and Tania Palumbo, the show’s illustrative style is a tribute to the iconography and drawing style of the manga, even though it is presented through 3D CGI animation. But the imagery is simultaneously inspired by scenes from the Paris region, from a Renault production plant in Boulogne-Billancourt to a high school in Sceaux.

Code Lyoko represents how manga and anime, adapted with a few French twists, triumphed in France – even to the point of being teleported to living rooms in the United States, where the show dazzled at least one curious (and unsuspecting) college student, who could hardly have imagined that she would one day live in Paris.

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‘Visions’ Trailer Unveils Japanese Animated Series https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/ https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/#respond Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://mazingerz-world.com/visions-trailer-unveils-japanese-animated-series/ Sub or dub? You have to choose, Anakin! Well, that was meant to happen: Star wars became anime with his new series Star Wars: Visions. Reinvent the galaxy with #StarWarsVisions, an original series featuring stories from seven visionary Japanese animation studios, airing September 22 on @DisneyPlus. 1:00 p.m. – August 17, 2021 @starwars The Visions […]]]>


Sub or dub? You have to choose, Anakin!

Well, that was meant to happen: Star wars became anime with his new series Star Wars: Visions.

Reinvent the galaxy with #StarWarsVisions, an original series featuring stories from seven visionary Japanese animation studios, airing September 22 on @DisneyPlus.

@starwars

The Visions The series will feature nine episodes created by seven different Japanese animation studios.

There will be options to watch the dubbed version and the subtitled version.

Disney +

So which one will you choose?

The English dub is packed with talent: Lucy Liu, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Temuera Morrison, David Harbor, Neil Patrick Harris, George Takei and Alison Brie (to name a few).

That being said, I think I’ll stick with the captioned version. This is the first time that Japanese anime studios have got their hands on Star wars, so I want to fully live their way.

The artwork will wow people. I mean, seriously, just look at this picture:

Disney +

Check out this video posted on the show last month.

I also like the fact that we mostly get new characters. I can’t wait to find a new favorite character.

Will you watch Star Wars: Vision on Disney Plus on September 22? Comments below!

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